Ally Fogg writes about anonymity for rape defendants being scrapped in 1988

Sculpture outside a tea room Mount Emie, Sichuan Province, China, June 2013

Sculpture outside a tea room Mount Emie, Sichuan Province, China, June 2013

Ally Fogg writes about anonymity for rape defendants being scrapped in 1988

Half way through the article he writes:

In other words, the argument being made in favour of retaining anonymity at the time were what we could broadly call pro-feminist – concerned with protecting rape victims and with concerns about the media sensationalizing sexual offence trials. At the division, those voting to retain anonymity for defendants included most left-leaning MPs, including any identifiably feminist women in the House, such as Gwyneth Dunwoody, Clare Short, Margaret Ewing and Maria Fyfe, who was shadow minister for women at the time.

Gwyneth Dunwoody a feminist?  Well here’s Andrew Rawnsley writing in The Observer on Sunday 21 October 2001

“Betty joins the League of Labour Youth and, in those unreconstructed days: ‘I entered a beauty contest and won a prize.’ This is just one of many relentless references to her physical attractiveness. Her ‘shapely’ legs get many a mention. She quotes – without complaint – a man’s description of her as a ‘solid, comely wench’. She is delighted when Cosmopolitan names ‘me one of its favourite babes’. Goodness knows why the lady needs to protest so much. No wonder she is despised by the more feminist generation of younger Labour women, a sentiment returned with interest.

She delivers a familiar complaint about New Labour’s treatment of the Commons without demonstrating much understanding of why the Government’s contempt for her palace is so widely shared by the voters.

You can’t help coming away with the feeling that Mr Blair’s real offence, in the eyes of Queen Betty, is not that he has marginalised Parliament, but that he has committed lèse-majesté.”

And here’s Bitethehand writing below an article by Cath Elliot – The 2009 Summer of Hate  “The recent vitriolic attacks on Harriet Harman and Hillary Clinton have a clear message: women cannot be trusted to run the show.”

Of Gwyneth Dunwoody:

“She belonged to an experienced political dynasty: her father, Morgan Phillips, was General Secretary of the Labour Party between 1944 and 1962; her mother, Norah Phillips was a life peer in the House of Lords and Lord Lieutenant of Greater London (1978-86); both her grandmothers were suffragettes…”

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