Censoring Comment is Free – the chickens come home to roost at The Guardian

Restoration work in progress, Chao Say Tevoda Temple, Cambodia, 2007.

Restoration work in progress, Chao Say Tevoda Temple, Cambodia, 2007.

Censoring Comment is Free – the chickens come home to roost at The Guardian

James Ball writes in today’s Guardian:

When you Google someone from within the EU, you no longer see what the search giant thinks is the most important and relevant information about an individual. You see the most important information the target of your search is not trying to hide.

Stark evidence of this fact, the result of a European court ruling that individuals had the right to remove material about themselves from search engine results, arrived in the Guardian’s inbox this morning, in the form of an automated notification that six Guardian articles have been scrubbed from search results.

But why should James Ball be surprised when the Guardian is itself guilty of removing content from its online edition so as seriously to distort the historical record.

In May 2009, at the end of her popular and much acclaimed article Don’t blame the police for Sabina Akhtar’s murder, the writer, Jane Nichol-Bell / BeautifulBurnout was asked by the poster TaBeMar, “if you were asked to write the same article, now that you have had the debate, would it be the same?”

We don’t know if Jane Nichol-Bell replied and if she did, what that reply was, as in an act of censorship, the Guardian removed her posts from the thread that followed the article and on every thread she’d ever posted on.

MrBullFrog posted:

Your comments below the line have very often been interesting and well-informed; they have had the benefit of drawing on what you have seen and what you know.

But how can anyone tell as the comments have been removed.

A cursory reading of the thread of comments below the article demonstrates that a great number of  the author’s posts have been removed, thereby making many of the responses somewhat difficult to follow.

So maybe the European Court and Google have taken a leaf out of the Guardian’s book.

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